Performance Platform

The Performance Platform headed by Prof. Ursula Damm carries out research into the spontaneous dynamic behaviour of human beings and animals.

To borrow a phrase from Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, the task of the platform is »to draw a clear line with the clearly-defined task of stimulating the human being to create her or his own personal experience« (Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Vom Material zur Architektur, 1929, p.6). This artistic initiative brings not only its stated aim, but also philosophical and cultural values into focus.

How is it possible to create and experience cultural values in a civilisation dominated by technology – and more specifically, here in the Digital Bauhaus Lab? In collaboration with scientists we aim to collaborate in our Performance Platform, trying to find answers to questions such as this helps us to develop new living environments.

A marker-less multi-person tracking system allows us to carry out research into social interaction in complex contexts. Which representations afford an understanding of the ‘other‘? Multifaceted interaction processes between human beings and technological or animal agents  are recorded in terms of their meaning. They are then artistically interpreted and communicated. With the aid of a high-speed camera, a detailed recording and analysis of swarms of mosquitos is carried out, as well as a differentiated long-term observation of crowds of human beings.

In combination with the tracking system, a video wall creates a media performance unit for dancers, musicians, animators, animals and/or performers with experimental devices. On this video wall, visionary spaces and perspectives become a functional, connective element of the actions.

Selected Projects

Publications & Exhibitions

U. Damm. Special Mention für chromatographic ballads der VIDA 15.0, 2013.

»Acting in an environment«, Vortrag auf der Konferenz Bacterial Networks der European Science Foundation

Ursula Damm, Bernhard Hopfengärtner, Dominik Niopek, Philipp Bayer: Are artists and engineers inventing the culture of tomorrow? Futures 48 (2013), S. 55-64